18 Feb 2010

The Light & Shadow Salon

18 Feb 2010
7:00 PM

Doors 7:00pm

The Light & Shadow Salon Presents

Visual Arts & The Moving Image

This Salon will explore the relationship between the moving image and other disciplines within the Visual Arts, focusing on the way in which film is used by artists who work predominantly in a field other than film, and the way in which narrative is explored within the parameters of the moving image vs 2D representation and live art.
We will be looking at filmmakers who have an unorthodox approach to narrative and filmmaking as a language, who have a background in the fine arts and who use this sensibility/training to carve out an idiosyncratic approach to film.
Also, artists from other visual art disciplines that experiment with film, video and animation.

programme includes moving image work by

ZAELIA BISHOP // FELTUS BROTHERS // YUI HAMAGASHIRA // HELENA HUNTER // JEANNE MADIC // NICHOLAS MCARTHUR // MATTEO PIZZARELLO // JAMIE QUANTRILL // FERNANDA VERON // AGNIESZKA WOZNICKA

and live music by
GEORGE KAPLAN PRESENTS and VANISHING TWINS
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The Light & Shadow Salon is a place for artists, writers and audience to meet and share ideas about the past, present and future of the moving image in all its forms.

The Salon is a place for exchange, interaction and cross-pollination and it welcomes active contributions and interventions from all its participants.

The Salon endeavours to support a structured and informed dialogue around film, the moving image and all that it involves: from magic to science, from sound to the eye, from ritualism to storytelling, from myth-making to hypnosis.

The Salon intends to act as a temporary and ephemeral container for all the work, ideas and people with an independent, radical and idiosyncratic nature, who renounce to find a home in existing movements/institutions but rather embrace the nomadic and transitory nature of art.

The Salon supports individual thought, inquisitive minds and a desire to further knowledge through dialogue and exchange.

‘So when you hear yourself invited to ‘see’, it is not the sight of this eye (of the flesh) that I would have you think about. You have another eye within, much clearer that that one, an eye that looks at the past, the present, and the future all at once, which sheds the light and keenness of its vision over all things, which penetrates things hidden and searches into complexities, needing no other light by which to see all this, but seeing by the light that it possesses itself.’
(Hugh of St Victor)